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Is your home NRG-wise?

How Energy Efficient is your Home?

If you're interested in finding out where your home is leaking money, then you've come to the right place!

Mouse over the different areas of the house to identify the areas of a house most prone to energy leaks. Click on the different areas to find out more information on how to improve the energy efficiency of your home.

Solar Hot Water: Utilize the sun’s free energy to help heat your domestic hot water.

Hot water heated by the sun is perhaps best known in a residential setting to provide hot domestic water.

In order to heat water using solar energy, a collector, often fastened to a roof or a wall facing the sun, heats a fluid that is either pumped (active system) or driven by natural convection (passive system) through it. The collector could be made of a simple glass topped insulated box with a flat solar absorber made of sheet metal attached to copper pipes and painted black, or a set of metal tubes surrounded by an evacuated (near vacuum) glass cylinder.

Heat is stored in a hot water storage tank. The volume of this tank needs to be larger with solar heating systems in order to allow for bad weather, and because the optimum final temperature for the solar collector is lower than a typical immersion or combustion heater. The heat transfer fluid (HTF) for the absorber may be the hot water from the tank, but more commonly (at least in active systems) is a separate loop of fluid containing anti-freeze and a corrosion inhibitor which delivers heat to the tank through a heat exchanger (commonly a coil of copper tubing within the tank).

Another lower-maintenance concept is the 'drain-back': no anti-freeze is required; instead all the piping is sloped to cause water to drain back to the tank. The tank is not pressurized and is open to atmospheric pressure. As soon as the pump shuts off, flow reverses and the pipes are empty before freezing could occur.

Solar Thermal installations typically include an auxiliary energy source (electric heating element or connection to a gas or fuel oil central heating system) that is activated when the water in the tank falls below a minimum temperature setting. Hence, hot water is always available. The combination of solar water heating and using the back-up heat can enable a hot water system to work all year round in cooler climates.

Solar Photovoltaic (PV)

Capture the suns energy and convert it to usable electricity.

Attic Insulation: Increase your attic insulation and reduce your heating & cooling cost, improving the comfort of your home.

Thermal Insulation

Thermal Insulation in houses is an important factor in achieving thermal comfort for occupants. Insulation reduces unwanted heat loss or gain and can decrease the energy demands of heating and cooling systems. In a narrow sense insulation can just refer to the insulation materials employed to slow heat loss, such as: cellulose, glass wool, rock wool, polystyrene, urethane foam, vermiculite, perlite, wood fibre, plant fibre (canabis, flax, cotton, cork, etc.), plant straw, animal fibre (sheeps wool), cementitious and earth or soil, but it can also involve a range of designs and techniques to address the main modes of heat transfer - conduction, radiation and convection materials.

R-Value

The effectiveness of insulation is commonly evaluated by its R-value. However, an R-value does not take into account the quality of construction or local environmental factors for each building. Construction quality issues include inadequate vapour barriers, and problems with draft-proofing. In addition, the properties and density of the insulation material itself is critical.

Weatherization

To determine whether you should add insulation, you first need to find out how much insulation you already have in your home and where. A Registered Energy Advisor will include an insulation check as a routine part of a whole-house Energy Assessment.

Wall Insulation: Add insulation to the exterior walls of your house and save energy

Thermal Insulation

Thermal Insulation in houses is an important factor in achieving thermal comfort for occupants. Insulation reduces unwanted heat loss or gain and can decrease the energy demands of heating and cooling systems. In a narrow sense insulation can just refer to the insulation materials employed to slow heat loss, such as: cellulose, glass wool, rock wool, polystyrene, urethane foam, vermiculite, perlite, wood fibre, plant fibre (canabis, flax, cotton, cork, etc.), plant straw, animal fibre (sheeps wool), cementitiousand earth or soil, but it can also involve a range of designs and techniques to address the main modes of heat transfer - conduction, radiation and convection materials.

R-Value

The effectiveness of insulation is commonly evaluated by its R-value. However, an R-value does not take into account the quality of construction or local environmental factors for each building. Construction quality issues include inadequate vapour barriers, and problems with draft-proofing. In addition, the properties and density of the insulation material itself is critical.

Weatherization

To determine whether you should add insulation, you first need to find out how much insulation you already have in your home and where. A Registered Energy Advisor will include an insulation check as a routine part of a whole-house Energy Audit.

Windows: Replace old leaky windows with new EnergyStar qualified units and save energy

Types of Windows

Double-Hung Sash Window:

Today, most new double-hung sash windows use spring balances to support the sashes. Traditionally, counterweights held in boxes on either side of the window were used. Counterweights were attached to the sashes using pulleys and cord or chain.

Single-Hung Sash Window

One sash is movable (usually the bottom one) and the other fixed.

Horizontal Sliding Sash Window

Consists of two or more sashes that overlap slightly but slide horizontally within the frame.

Casement Window

A window with a hinged sash that typically swings out like a door. In North America, these are usually opened using a crank. Handing applies to casement windows to determine direction of swing; a casement window may be left-handed, right-handed, or double.

Awning Window

An awning window is a casement window that is hung horizontally, hinged on top, so that it swings outward like an awning.

Hopper Window

A hopper window is a bottom hung casement window that opens similar to a draw bridge typically opening to the outside.

Transom Window

A window above a door; in an exterior door the transom window is often fixed, in an interior door it can open either by hinges at top or bottom, or rotate on hinges.

Jalousie Window

Also known as a louvered window, the jalousie window consists of parallel slats of glass or acrylic that open and close like a venetian blind, usually using a crank or a lever.

Skylight

A flat or slope window used for daylighting, built into a roof structure that is out of reach.

Bay Window

A multi-panel window, with at least three panels set at different angles to create a protrusion from the wall line.

Fixed Window

A window that cannot be opened, whose function is limited to allowing light to enter.

Emergency Exit/Egress Window

A window big enough and low enough so that occupants can escape through the opening in an emergency, such as a fire. Exact specifications for emergency windows in bedrooms are given in many building codes.

French Window/French Door

A French window, also known as a French door is really a type of door, but one which has one or more panes of glass set into the whole length of the door, meaning it also functions as a window.

Window Components

Lite or Light:

a glass pane, several of which may be used to construct the final window product.

Muntins:

Narrow strip of wood or metal that divide the lites in a window sash both vertically and horizontally.

Mullions:

These are more substantial load bearing or structural vertical dividers, with the corresponding horizontal dividers referred to as Transoms.

Replacement Window:

A framed window designed to slip inside the original window frame from the inside after the old sashes are removed.

New Construction Window:

A window with a nailing fin designed to be inserted into a rough opening from the outside before applying siding and inside trim. A nailing fin is a projection on the outer frame of the window in the same plane as the glazing, which overlaps the prepared opening, and can thus be ‘nailed’ into place. Windows in new-build houses can also be fixed with long screws.

Lintel or Transom:

A beam over the top of a window

Sill Plate/Window Sill:

Beam below the bottom of a window.

Glazing:

Low-emissivity coated panes reduce heat transfer by radiation. Depending on which surface is coated, determines it heat loss (in cold climates) or heat gains (in warm climates) properties. Modern double-pane and triple-pane windows often include one or more low-e coatings to reduce the window’s rate of heat loss/gain. In general, soft-coat low-e coatings tend to result in a lower solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) than hard-coat low-e coatings.

Gas Fillers:

High thermal resistance can be obtained by evacuating or filling the insulated glazing units with gases such as argon or krypton, which reduces conductive heat transfer.

Spacer:

The glass panes are separated by a “spacer”. A spacer is the component used in window manufacturing that separates the two or three panes of glass in an insulating glass (IG) system, and seals the gas space between them. Spacers can be made of metal or of a less-conductive material such as structural foam, or various types of other materials.

R-Value:

The effectiveness of insulated glass can be expressed as an R-value. The higher the R-value, the greater is its resistance to heat transfer. A standard IGU consisting of clear uncoated panes of glass (or lites) with air in the cavity between the lites has an R-value of 2.

A rule of thumb in standard IGU construction is that each change in the component of the IGU results in an increase of 1 R-value to the efficiency of the unit. Adding Argon gas increases the efficiency to about R-3. Using low emissivity glass on surface #2 will add another R-value. Properly designed triple glazed IGUs with low emissivity coatings on surfaces #2 and #4 and filled with argon gas in the cavities result in IG units with R-values as high as R-5.

Low Flush Toilets: Replace older toilets that use large amounts of water with more efficient low flush units

A low flush or low flow toilet uses significantly less water than a full flush toilet. Most low flush toilets use 6 liters, or 1.6 gallons per flush as opposed to the usual 13.2 liters, or about 3.5 gallons. Many dual flush toilets have a 6 litre and a lower flush. A low flush toilet can help you save money, protect the environment and conserve water. But with over 1,000 different models to choose from, how do you know what to look for when purchasing a toilet?

MaP Report

The Canadian Water and Wastewater Association (CWWA) and its partners in Canada and the United States created the Maximum Performance Testing Program (MaP). The goal of MaP is to test toilet models under realistic conditions. Then, each of the models tested was given a grade based on its overall performance, to assist consumers with deciding which model is right for them.

The report is updated on a regular basis and is available free of charge from the CWWA website at www.cwwa.ca.

Faucets

Replace your high water usage shower head and sink faucet with new low flow units to decrease water usage and costs

Shower Head

Replace your high water usage shower head and sink faucet with new low flow units to decrease water usage and costs.

Exterior Doors

Replace old inefficient exterior doors with Energy Star qualified units and save energy.

Fireplace

Upgrade your fireplace with and save energy.

Air Conditioner

Cut down on your home cooling cost, with high efficiency air conditioning system.

Basement Floor Insulation: Building a new house. Ensure that your basement floors are insulated and save energy

Thermal Insulation

Thermal Insulation in houses is an important factor in achieving thermal comfort for occupants. Insulation reduces unwanted heat loss or gain and can decrease the energy demands of heating and cooling systems. In a narrow sense insulation can just refer to the insulation materials employed to slow heat loss, such as: cellulose, glass wool, rock wool, polystyrene, urethane foam, vermiculite, perlite, wood fibre, plant fibre (canabis, flax, cotton, cork, etc.), plant straw, animal fibre (sheeps wool), cementitiousand earth or soil, but it can also involve a range of designs and techniques to address the main modes of heat transfer - conduction, radiation and convection materials.

R-Value

The effectiveness of insulation is commonly evaluated by its R-value. However, an R-value does not take into account the quality of construction or local environmental factors for each building. Construction quality issues include inadequate vapour barriers, and problems with draft-proofing. In addition, the properties and density of the insulation material itself is critical.

Weatherization

To determine whether you should add insulation, you first need to find out how much insulation you already have in your home and where. A Registered Energy Advisor will include an insulation check as a routine part of a whole-house Energy Audit.

Domestic Hot Water

Replace your inefficient hot water tank with an on demand tankless system and reduce energy costs.

Heating System

Replace your older heating system with an ENERGY STAR qualified unit and save energy.

Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV): Increase comfort and the quality of the air you breathe inside your house

The less natural airflow into a building, the more mechanical ventilation will be required to support human comfort. High humidity can be a significant issue associated with lack of airflow, causing condensation, rotting construction materials, and encouraging microbial growth such as mould and bacteria. Moisture can also drastically reduce the effectiveness of insulation by creating a thermal bridge.

HRVs employ a counter-flow heat exchanger (countercurrent heat exchange) between the inbound and outbound air flow. HRV provides fresh air and improved climate control, while also saving energy by reducing the heating (or cooling) requirements.

Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) are closely related, however ERVs also transfer the humidity level of the exhaust air to the intake air.

Benefits

As building efficiency is improved with insulation and weatherstripping, buildings are intentionally made more air-tight, and consequently less ventilated. Since all buildings require a source of fresh air, the need for HRVs has become obvious. While opening a window does provide ventilation, the building's heat and humidity will then be lost in the winter and gained in the summer, both of which are undesirable for the indoor climate and for energy efficiency, since the building's HVAC systems must compensate. HRV technology offers an optimal solution: fresh air, better climate control, and energy efficient.

Weatherization

To determine whether your house needs a HRV, contact a Registered Energy Advisor. An air tightness test is an integral part of a whole-house Energy Assessment.

Ground Source Heat Pump

Capture energy from the ground to heat your house in the winter and cool your house in the summer.

Faucets

Replace your high water usage shower head and sink faucet with new low flow units to decrease water usage and costs

Basement Floor Insulation: Building a new house. Ensure that your basement floors are insulated and save energy

Thermal Insulation

Thermal Insulation in houses is an important factor in achieving thermal comfort for occupants. Insulation reduces unwanted heat loss or gain and can decrease the energy demands of heating and cooling systems. In a narrow sense insulation can just refer to the insulation materials employed to slow heat loss, such as: cellulose, glass wool, rock wool, polystyrene, urethane foam, vermiculite, perlite, wood fibre, plant fibre (canabis, flax, cotton, cork, etc.), plant straw, animal fibre (sheeps wool), cementitiousand earth or soil, but it can also involve a range of designs and techniques to address the main modes of heat transfer - conduction, radiation and convection materials.

R-Value

The effectiveness of insulation is commonly evaluated by its R-value. However, an R-value does not take into account the quality of construction or local environmental factors for each building. Construction quality issues include inadequate vapour barriers, and problems with draft-proofing. In addition, the properties and density of the insulation material itself is critical.

Weatherization

To determine whether you should add insulation, you first need to find out how much insulation you already have in your home and where. A Registered Energy Advisor will include an insulation check as a routine part of a whole-house Energy Audit.

Wall Insulation: Add insulation to the exterior walls of your house and save energy

Thermal Insulation

Thermal Insulation in houses is an important factor in achieving thermal comfort for occupants. Insulation reduces unwanted heat loss or gain and can decrease the energy demands of heating and cooling systems. In a narrow sense insulation can just refer to the insulation materials employed to slow heat loss, such as: cellulose, glass wool, rock wool, polystyrene, urethane foam, vermiculite, perlite, wood fibre, plant fibre (canabis, flax, cotton, cork, etc.), plant straw, animal fibre (sheeps wool), cementitiousand earth or soil, but it can also involve a range of designs and techniques to address the main modes of heat transfer - conduction, radiation and convection materials.

R-Value

The effectiveness of insulation is commonly evaluated by its R-value. However, an R-value does not take into account the quality of construction or local environmental factors for each building. Construction quality issues include inadequate vapour barriers, and problems with draft-proofing. In addition, the properties and density of the insulation material itself is critical.

Weatherization

To determine whether you should add insulation, you first need to find out how much insulation you already have in your home and where. A Registered Energy Advisor will include an insulation check as a routine part of a whole-house Energy Audit.

Windows: Replace old leaky windows with new EnergyStar qualified units and save energy

Types of Windows

Double-Hung Sash Window:

Today, most new double-hung sash windows use spring balances to support the sashes. Traditionally, counterweights held in boxes on either side of the window were used. Counterweights were attached to the sashes using pulleys and cord or chain.

Single-Hung Sash Window

One sash is movable (usually the bottom one) and the other fixed.

Horizontal Sliding Sash Window

Consists of two or more sashes that overlap slightly but slide horizontally within the frame.

Casement Window

A window with a hinged sash that typically swings out like a door. In North America, these are usually opened using a crank. Handing applies to casement windows to determine direction of swing; a casement window may be left-handed, right-handed, or double.

Awning Window

An awning window is a casement window that is hung horizontally, hinged on top, so that it swings outward like an awning.

Hopper Window

A hopper window is a bottom hung casement window that opens similar to a draw bridge typically opening to the outside.

Transom Window

A window above a door; in an exterior door the transom window is often fixed, in an interior door it can open either by hinges at top or bottom, or rotate on hinges.

Jalousie Window

Also known as a louvered window, the jalousie window consists of parallel slats of glass or acrylic that open and close like a venetian blind, usually using a crank or a lever.

Skylight

A flat or slope window used for daylighting, built into a roof structure that is out of reach.

Bay Window

A multi-panel window, with at least three panels set at different angles to create a protrusion from the wall line.

Fixed Window

A window that cannot be opened, whose function is limited to allowing light to enter.

Emergency Exit/Egress Window

A window big enough and low enough so that occupants can escape through the opening in an emergency, such as a fire. Exact specifications for emergency windows in bedrooms are given in many building codes.

French Window/French Door

A French window, also known as a French door is really a type of door, but one which has one or more panes of glass set into the whole length of the door, meaning it also functions as a window.

Window Components

Lite or Light:

a glass pane, several of which may be used to construct the final window product.

Muntins:

Narrow strip of wood or metal that divide the lites in a window sash both vertically and horizontally.

Mullions:

These are more substantial load bearing or structural vertical dividers, with the corresponding horizontal dividers referred to as Transoms.

Replacement Window:

A framed window designed to slip inside the original window frame from the inside after the old sashes are removed.

New Construction Window:

A window with a nailing fin designed to be inserted into a rough opening from the outside before applying siding and inside trim. A nailing fin is a projection on the outer frame of the window in the same plane as the glazing, which overlaps the prepared opening, and can thus be ‘nailed’ into place. Windows in new-build houses can also be fixed with long screws.

Lintel or Transom:

A beam over the top of a window

Sill Plate/Window Sill:

Beam below the bottom of a window.

Glazing:

Low-emissivity coated panes reduce heat transfer by radiation. Depending on which surface is coated, determines it heat loss (in cold climates) or heat gains (in warm climates) properties. Modern double-pane and triple-pane windows often include one or more low-e coatings to reduce the window’s rate of heat loss/gain. In general, soft-coat low-e coatings tend to result in a lower solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) than hard-coat low-e coatings.

Gas Fillers:

High thermal resistance can be obtained by evacuating or filling the insulated glazing units with gases such as argon or krypton, which reduces conductive heat transfer.

Spacer:

The glass panes are separated by a “spacer”. A spacer is the component used in window manufacturing that separates the two or three panes of glass in an insulating glass (IG) system, and seals the gas space between them. Spacers can be made of metal or of a less-conductive material such as structural foam, or various types of other materials.

R-Value:

The effectiveness of insulated glass can be expressed as an R-value. The higher the R-value, the greater is its resistance to heat transfer. A standard IGU consisting of clear uncoated panes of glass (or lites) with air in the cavity between the lites has an R-value of 2.

A rule of thumb in standard IGU construction is that each change in the component of the IGU results in an increase of 1 R-value to the efficiency of the unit. Adding Argon gas increases the efficiency to about R-3. Using low emissivity glass on surface #2 will add another R-value. Properly designed triple glazed IGUs with low emissivity coatings on surfaces #2 and #4 and filled with argon gas in the cavities result in IG units with R-values as high as R-5.

Windows: Replace old leaky windows with new EnergyStar qualified units and save energy

Types of Windows

Double-Hung Sash Window:

Today, most new double-hung sash windows use spring balances to support the sashes. Traditionally, counterweights held in boxes on either side of the window were used. Counterweights were attached to the sashes using pulleys and cord or chain.

Single-Hung Sash Window

One sash is movable (usually the bottom one) and the other fixed.

Horizontal Sliding Sash Window

Consists of two or more sashes that overlap slightly but slide horizontally within the frame.

Casement Window

A window with a hinged sash that typically swings out like a door. In North America, these are usually opened using a crank. Handing applies to casement windows to determine direction of swing; a casement window may be left-handed, right-handed, or double.

Awning Window

An awning window is a casement window that is hung horizontally, hinged on top, so that it swings outward like an awning.

Hopper Window

A hopper window is a bottom hung casement window that opens similar to a draw bridge typically opening to the outside.

Transom Window

A window above a door; in an exterior door the transom window is often fixed, in an interior door it can open either by hinges at top or bottom, or rotate on hinges.

Jalousie Window

Also known as a louvered window, the jalousie window consists of parallel slats of glass or acrylic that open and close like a venetian blind, usually using a crank or a lever.

Skylight

A flat or slope window used for daylighting, built into a roof structure that is out of reach.

Bay Window

A multi-panel window, with at least three panels set at different angles to create a protrusion from the wall line.

Fixed Window

A window that cannot be opened, whose function is limited to allowing light to enter.

Emergency Exit/Egress Window

A window big enough and low enough so that occupants can escape through the opening in an emergency, such as a fire. Exact specifications for emergency windows in bedrooms are given in many building codes.

French Window/French Door

A French window, also known as a French door is really a type of door, but one which has one or more panes of glass set into the whole length of the door, meaning it also functions as a window.

Window Components

Lite or Light:

a glass pane, several of which may be used to construct the final window product.

Muntins:

Narrow strip of wood or metal that divide the lites in a window sash both vertically and horizontally.

Mullions:

These are more substantial load bearing or structural vertical dividers, with the corresponding horizontal dividers referred to as Transoms.

Replacement Window:

A framed window designed to slip inside the original window frame from the inside after the old sashes are removed.

New Construction Window:

A window with a nailing fin designed to be inserted into a rough opening from the outside before applying siding and inside trim. A nailing fin is a projection on the outer frame of the window in the same plane as the glazing, which overlaps the prepared opening, and can thus be ‘nailed’ into place. Windows in new-build houses can also be fixed with long screws.

Lintel or Transom:

A beam over the top of a window

Sill Plate/Window Sill:

Beam below the bottom of a window.

Glazing:

Low-emissivity coated panes reduce heat transfer by radiation. Depending on which surface is coated, determines it heat loss (in cold climates) or heat gains (in warm climates) properties. Modern double-pane and triple-pane windows often include one or more low-e coatings to reduce the window’s rate of heat loss/gain. In general, soft-coat low-e coatings tend to result in a lower solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) than hard-coat low-e coatings.

Gas Fillers:

High thermal resistance can be obtained by evacuating or filling the insulated glazing units with gases such as argon or krypton, which reduces conductive heat transfer.

Spacer:

The glass panes are separated by a “spacer”. A spacer is the component used in window manufacturing that separates the two or three panes of glass in an insulating glass (IG) system, and seals the gas space between them. Spacers can be made of metal or of a less-conductive material such as structural foam, or various types of other materials.

R-Value:

The effectiveness of insulated glass can be expressed as an R-value. The higher the R-value, the greater is its resistance to heat transfer. A standard IGU consisting of clear uncoated panes of glass (or lites) with air in the cavity between the lites has an R-value of 2.

A rule of thumb in standard IGU construction is that each change in the component of the IGU results in an increase of 1 R-value to the efficiency of the unit. Adding Argon gas increases the efficiency to about R-3. Using low emissivity glass on surface #2 will add another R-value. Properly designed triple glazed IGUs with low emissivity coatings on surfaces #2 and #4 and filled with argon gas in the cavities result in IG units with R-values as high as R-5.

Windows: Replace old leaky windows with new EnergyStar qualified units and save energy

Types of Windows

Double-Hung Sash Window:

Today, most new double-hung sash windows use spring balances to support the sashes. Traditionally, counterweights held in boxes on either side of the window were used. Counterweights were attached to the sashes using pulleys and cord or chain.

Single-Hung Sash Window

One sash is movable (usually the bottom one) and the other fixed.

Horizontal Sliding Sash Window

Consists of two or more sashes that overlap slightly but slide horizontally within the frame.

Casement Window

A window with a hinged sash that typically swings out like a door. In North America, these are usually opened using a crank. Handing applies to casement windows to determine direction of swing; a casement window may be left-handed, right-handed, or double.

Awning Window

An awning window is a casement window that is hung horizontally, hinged on top, so that it swings outward like an awning.

Hopper Window

A hopper window is a bottom hung casement window that opens similar to a draw bridge typically opening to the outside.

Transom Window

A window above a door; in an exterior door the transom window is often fixed, in an interior door it can open either by hinges at top or bottom, or rotate on hinges.

Jalousie Window

Also known as a louvered window, the jalousie window consists of parallel slats of glass or acrylic that open and close like a venetian blind, usually using a crank or a lever.

Skylight

A flat or slope window used for daylighting, built into a roof structure that is out of reach.

Bay Window

A multi-panel window, with at least three panels set at different angles to create a protrusion from the wall line.

Fixed Window

A window that cannot be opened, whose function is limited to allowing light to enter.

Emergency Exit/Egress Window

A window big enough and low enough so that occupants can escape through the opening in an emergency, such as a fire. Exact specifications for emergency windows in bedrooms are given in many building codes.

French Window/French Door

A French window, also known as a French door is really a type of door, but one which has one or more panes of glass set into the whole length of the door, meaning it also functions as a window.

Window Components

Lite or Light:

a glass pane, several of which may be used to construct the final window product.

Muntins:

Narrow strip of wood or metal that divide the lites in a window sash both vertically and horizontally.

Mullions:

These are more substantial load bearing or structural vertical dividers, with the corresponding horizontal dividers referred to as Transoms.

Replacement Window:

A framed window designed to slip inside the original window frame from the inside after the old sashes are removed.

New Construction Window:

A window with a nailing fin designed to be inserted into a rough opening from the outside before applying siding and inside trim. A nailing fin is a projection on the outer frame of the window in the same plane as the glazing, which overlaps the prepared opening, and can thus be ‘nailed’ into place. Windows in new-build houses can also be fixed with long screws.

Lintel or Transom:

A beam over the top of a window

Sill Plate/Window Sill:

Beam below the bottom of a window.

Glazing:

Low-emissivity coated panes reduce heat transfer by radiation. Depending on which surface is coated, determines it heat loss (in cold climates) or heat gains (in warm climates) properties. Modern double-pane and triple-pane windows often include one or more low-e coatings to reduce the window’s rate of heat loss/gain. In general, soft-coat low-e coatings tend to result in a lower solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) than hard-coat low-e coatings.

Gas Fillers:

High thermal resistance can be obtained by evacuating or filling the insulated glazing units with gases such as argon or krypton, which reduces conductive heat transfer.

Spacer:

The glass panes are separated by a “spacer”. A spacer is the component used in window manufacturing that separates the two or three panes of glass in an insulating glass (IG) system, and seals the gas space between them. Spacers can be made of metal or of a less-conductive material such as structural foam, or various types of other materials.

R-Value:

The effectiveness of insulated glass can be expressed as an R-value. The higher the R-value, the greater is its resistance to heat transfer. A standard IGU consisting of clear uncoated panes of glass (or lites) with air in the cavity between the lites has an R-value of 2.

A rule of thumb in standard IGU construction is that each change in the component of the IGU results in an increase of 1 R-value to the efficiency of the unit. Adding Argon gas increases the efficiency to about R-3. Using low emissivity glass on surface #2 will add another R-value. Properly designed triple glazed IGUs with low emissivity coatings on surfaces #2 and #4 and filled with argon gas in the cavities result in IG units with R-values as high as R-5.

Windows: Replace old leaky windows with new EnergyStar qualified units and save energy

Types of Windows

Double-Hung Sash Window:

Today, most new double-hung sash windows use spring balances to support the sashes. Traditionally, counterweights held in boxes on either side of the window were used. Counterweights were attached to the sashes using pulleys and cord or chain.

Single-Hung Sash Window

One sash is movable (usually the bottom one) and the other fixed.

Horizontal Sliding Sash Window

Consists of two or more sashes that overlap slightly but slide horizontally within the frame.

Casement Window

A window with a hinged sash that typically swings out like a door. In North America, these are usually opened using a crank. Handing applies to casement windows to determine direction of swing; a casement window may be left-handed, right-handed, or double.

Awning Window

An awning window is a casement window that is hung horizontally, hinged on top, so that it swings outward like an awning.

Hopper Window

A hopper window is a bottom hung casement window that opens similar to a draw bridge typically opening to the outside.

Transom Window

A window above a door; in an exterior door the transom window is often fixed, in an interior door it can open either by hinges at top or bottom, or rotate on hinges.

Jalousie Window

Also known as a louvered window, the jalousie window consists of parallel slats of glass or acrylic that open and close like a venetian blind, usually using a crank or a lever.

Skylight

A flat or slope window used for daylighting, built into a roof structure that is out of reach.

Bay Window

A multi-panel window, with at least three panels set at different angles to create a protrusion from the wall line.

Fixed Window

A window that cannot be opened, whose function is limited to allowing light to enter.

Emergency Exit/Egress Window

A window big enough and low enough so that occupants can escape through the opening in an emergency, such as a fire. Exact specifications for emergency windows in bedrooms are given in many building codes.

French Window/French Door

A French window, also known as a French door is really a type of door, but one which has one or more panes of glass set into the whole length of the door, meaning it also functions as a window.

Window Components

Lite or Light:

a glass pane, several of which may be used to construct the final window product.

Muntins:

Narrow strip of wood or metal that divide the lites in a window sash both vertically and horizontally.

Mullions:

These are more substantial load bearing or structural vertical dividers, with the corresponding horizontal dividers referred to as Transoms.

Replacement Window:

A framed window designed to slip inside the original window frame from the inside after the old sashes are removed.

New Construction Window:

A window with a nailing fin designed to be inserted into a rough opening from the outside before applying siding and inside trim. A nailing fin is a projection on the outer frame of the window in the same plane as the glazing, which overlaps the prepared opening, and can thus be ‘nailed’ into place. Windows in new-build houses can also be fixed with long screws.

Lintel or Transom:

A beam over the top of a window

Sill Plate/Window Sill:

Beam below the bottom of a window.

Glazing:

Low-emissivity coated panes reduce heat transfer by radiation. Depending on which surface is coated, determines it heat loss (in cold climates) or heat gains (in warm climates) properties. Modern double-pane and triple-pane windows often include one or more low-e coatings to reduce the window’s rate of heat loss/gain. In general, soft-coat low-e coatings tend to result in a lower solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) than hard-coat low-e coatings.

Gas Fillers:

High thermal resistance can be obtained by evacuating or filling the insulated glazing units with gases such as argon or krypton, which reduces conductive heat transfer.

Spacer:

The glass panes are separated by a “spacer”. A spacer is the component used in window manufacturing that separates the two or three panes of glass in an insulating glass (IG) system, and seals the gas space between them. Spacers can be made of metal or of a less-conductive material such as structural foam, or various types of other materials.

R-Value:

The effectiveness of insulated glass can be expressed as an R-value. The higher the R-value, the greater is its resistance to heat transfer. A standard IGU consisting of clear uncoated panes of glass (or lites) with air in the cavity between the lites has an R-value of 2.

A rule of thumb in standard IGU construction is that each change in the component of the IGU results in an increase of 1 R-value to the efficiency of the unit. Adding Argon gas increases the efficiency to about R-3. Using low emissivity glass on surface #2 will add another R-value. Properly designed triple glazed IGUs with low emissivity coatings on surfaces #2 and #4 and filled with argon gas in the cavities result in IG units with R-values as high as R-5.

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Seal your Leaky House: Contact one of our Home Energy Advisors to test your home and help identify area of air leakage

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

 

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Drain Water Heat Recovery: Recover heat lost down the drain and save energy

Water heat recycling (also known as drain water heat recovery, greywater heat recovery, or sometimes shower water heat recovery) is the use of a heat exchanger to recover energy and reuse heat from drain water from various activities such as dish-washing, clothes washing and especially showers. The technology is used to reduce primary energy consumption for water heating. Standard units can save up to 60% of the heat energy that is otherwise lost down the drain when using the shower. For a regular household, water heating is usually the second highest source of energy demand.

The technology is fully recognized in Canada by LEED for homes and ENERGY STAR for New Homes Canada.

Attic Hatch: Insulate and weatherstrip you attic hatch to reduce drafts and save energy

Air Sealing – Weatherization

Air leakage results in wasted energy, higher annual heating bills and causes our homes to be uncomfortable and unhealthy. Air leakage can account for 25 to 40 percent of the heat lost from an older home. This can cost you hundreds of dollars annually.

Cold air leaking into your house can make some rooms drafty, uncomfortable and difficult to heat, even with the thermostat turned up.

Shocks from static electricity, creaky furniture, dry throats and skin, laundry that “clings”: these are symptoms of excessive winter dryness. Cold, dry outdoor air leaking into your house is one of the villains.

Warm air leaking out of your house carries moisture in the form of water vapour. This moisture condenses in attic spaces and wall cavities, causing long-term deterioration. Problems include rotting roof sheathing, wet insulation, mould growth, buckled siding, spalling bricks and puddles in basement corners.

Eliminating air-leakage problems with a professional air-sealing job is usually the single most cost-effective repair you can make to an older home.

How to Detect Air Leaks

A Registered Energy Advisor can perform a fan depressurization test (also called a blower-door test) to calculate the air tightness of your house and walk around the house with you to identify the location of air leaks.

Set up an appointment to have your house tested.

How to Solve Air-Leakage Problems and Save Energy

  • Weatherstrip and caulk windows and doors
  • Upgrade or replace windows
  • Seal hidden openings into the attic
  • Sealing plumbing penetrations into the attic
  • Sealing lighting and wire penetrations into the attic
  • Sill and header detail
  • Make the attic hatch airtight
  • Seal the top of foundations
  • Seal baseboards
  • Seal electrical outlets
  • Close up seldom-used fireplaces

Basement Insulation Save energy by insulating your basement walls and header space

Thermal Insulation

Thermal Insulation in houses is an important factor in achieving thermal comfort for occupants. Insulation reduces unwanted heat loss or gain and can decrease the energy demands of heating and cooling systems. In a narrow sense insulation can just refer to the insulation materials employed to slow heat loss, such as: cellulose, glass wool, rock wool, polystyrene, urethane foam, vermiculite, perlite, wood fibre, plant fibre (canabis, flax, cotton, cork, etc.), plant straw, animal fibre (sheeps wool), cementitiousand earth or soil, but it can also involve a range of designs and techniques to address the main modes of heat transfer - conduction, radiation and convection materials.

R-Value

The effectiveness of insulation is commonly evaluated by its R-value. However, an R-value does not take into account the quality of construction or local environmental factors for each building. Construction quality issues include inadequate vapour barriers, and problems with draft-proofing. In addition, the properties and density of the insulation material itself is critical.

Weatherization

To determine whether you should add insulation, you first need to find out how much insulation you already have in your home and where. A Registered Energy Advisor will include an insulation check as a routine part of a whole-house Energy Assessment.

Basement Insulation Save energy by insulating your basement walls and header space

Thermal Insulation

Thermal Insulation in houses is an important factor in achieving thermal comfort for occupants. Insulation reduces unwanted heat loss or gain and can decrease the energy demands of heating and cooling systems. In a narrow sense insulation can just refer to the insulation materials employed to slow heat loss, such as: cellulose, glass wool, rock wool, polystyrene, urethane foam, vermiculite, perlite, wood fibre, plant fibre (canabis, flax, cotton, cork, etc.), plant straw, animal fibre (sheeps wool), cementitiousand earth or soil, but it can also involve a range of designs and techniques to address the main modes of heat transfer - conduction, radiation and convection materials.

R-Value

The effectiveness of insulation is commonly evaluated by its R-value. However, an R-value does not take into account the quality of construction or local environmental factors for each building. Construction quality issues include inadequate vapour barriers, and problems with draft-proofing. In addition, the properties and density of the insulation material itself is critical.

Weatherization

To determine whether you should add insulation, you first need to find out how much insulation you already have in your home and where. A Registered Energy Advisor will include an insulation check as a routine part of a whole-house Energy Assessment.

Basement Insulation Save energy by insulating your basement walls and header space

Thermal Insulation

Thermal Insulation in houses is an important factor in achieving thermal comfort for occupants. Insulation reduces unwanted heat loss or gain and can decrease the energy demands of heating and cooling systems. In a narrow sense insulation can just refer to the insulation materials employed to slow heat loss, such as: cellulose, glass wool, rock wool, polystyrene, urethane foam, vermiculite, perlite, wood fibre, plant fibre (canabis, flax, cotton, cork, etc.), plant straw, animal fibre (sheeps wool), cementitiousand earth or soil, but it can also involve a range of designs and techniques to address the main modes of heat transfer - conduction, radiation and convection materials.

R-Value

The effectiveness of insulation is commonly evaluated by its R-value. However, an R-value does not take into account the quality of construction or local environmental factors for each building. Construction quality issues include inadequate vapour barriers, and problems with draft-proofing. In addition, the properties and density of the insulation material itself is critical.

Weatherization

To determine whether you should add insulation, you first need to find out how much insulation you already have in your home and where. A Registered Energy Advisor will include an insulation check as a routine part of a whole-house Energy Assessment.

EnerGuide
Canadian Association of Home and Property Inspectors
Energy Star Participant
Ontario Association of Home Inspectors
International Association of Certified Home Inspectors

EnerGuide is an official mark of Natural Resources Canada and is used with permission. Please visit www.nrcan.gc.ca for information on Canada’s EnerGuide Rating System initiative.

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